Student athlete or athlete student: which comes first?

Miranda Bukantz

It’s twelve o’ clock on a Friday afternoon and your stomach is churning. It is the day of your big state game for basketball and you are leaving school at one to catch the bus and ride over to Ellensburg. At this moment you are sitting in AP Lang, but your mind is not on rhetorical strategies. Next, you have chemistry, but you won’t be there because you will be off playing a sports game.

Student athletes are expected to get their schoolwork done before sports. There is an expectation that they will keep their grades while competing six days a week for multiple hours of the day. On top of the abundance of hours these student athletes spend outside the classroom on their sports, the sports force them to miss school frequently. This is not beneficial to these students, and should not be allowed.

All student athletes are high school students, therefore they get out of school around 2:15-2:30. It does not make sense, nor should it be allowed to start a game earlier than that time.

Students are expected to have good grades year round. But when students miss class time, there is no time for them to make up work. For example, if a student misses chemistry and has to make up a lab, there is no other time to do that besides after school. But after school the athlete has practice and is discouraged from missing it- even for school affairs.

Pulling students out of class for sporting events is a bad idea because it also tempts others to skip class. Those who drive cars and want to support their friends will skip class. This will lead to a decline in grades.

School is more important, therefor should be put in front of sports. It is unacceptable to allow student athletes to skip school for sporting events.